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Dinner, Glutenfree, Good food on a budget, Lactose-free, LCHF, Lunch, Nut-free, Paleo, Recipes, Soup, Tastecelebration, Vegan, Vegetarian, Veggies, Without refined sugar
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Make me feel a better person-soup (or just vegan Miso soup without tofu)

So finally, December is past and January started. I hope you al have had a good Christmas and new year! Personally I couldn’t wait for the routines of normal weekdays to start again. Not so much because I don’t like holiday’s but because I like the feeling of being “on it” with both food and sports. Do you feel the same?  Maybe you also have the feeling, just like me, of bringing in new routines in your life, or just taking back the old ones you had? Maybe this soup is the kick in the right direction?

This is vegan miso soup my way; without the bonito-flakes and the tofu that normally is to be found in the soup.

The bonito flakes (made of tuna) are traditionally included in the dashi broth to give the savory umami taste (one of the five basic tastes together with sweetness, sourness, bitterness and saltiness). Since I wanted to make this soup vegan, I had to exclude that. Instead, I added some dried mushrooms and of course the Kombu, an edible kelp. Both of these have lots of umami as well and gives a depth to the dish.

Since I try to avoid soya products in my kitchen, the tofu also had to go. The gluten-free miso (also made of fermented soybeans), I decided to keep for the taste. If you prefer, please feel free to also add some sliced silken tofu at the end of the making of the soup.

Try the soup for lunch, dinner or even as breakfast as the Japanese are eating it! It will make you feel light and warm inside.

Let’s get to work!
Ingredients for 1 person

Dashi broth
10 gram dried Kombu
0,5 liter cold water

How do I do it?
Add the water and Kombu to a jar and let it sit in the refrigerator over night. If you are short in time, leave it in room temperature for about 1 hour. When done, strain the water and add it to a pan.

Miso soup
0,5 liter readymade Dashi broth as described above
5 gram of Arame or Nori  seaweed
1 tsp miso (see that it really is gluten-free!)
10 cm of leek (only the white part)
5 sliced mushrooms plus some fresh shiitake and enoki if you can get it
2 dried mushrooms like shiitake or porcini
1/2 thumb fresh ginger
1/2-1 garlic clove
1 scallion
A small dash of mirin (Japanese rice wine with a low alcohol content)
A bigger dash of fresh lemon

How do I do it?
1. Soak the seaweed in some water while you make the soup.
2. Peel the garlic and ginger and slice it in thin slices. I like to keep the ginger in the soup also when eating, so I cut it in bite size. You can also cut it bigger pieces to easier find them and separate  them from the soup before serving if you prefer.
3. Add the ginger, garlic, some dried mushrooms and the miso paste to the dashi broth. Let is simmer until warm, about 10 minutes. Stir every now and then with a wooden spatula.
4. Meanwhile cooking, slice the vegetables. Add them to the soup. Keep some of the scallion apart for the serving.
5. Let is carefully simmer for another 5 minutes. Soak the seaweed in cold water and add it to the soup when almost done.
6. Add a splash of mirin and lemon to the soup to get a freshness fitting with the sea taste. Check the seasoning before serving.
7. Add some cut scallion on top and serve steaming hot. Feel the power coming from your inside. Enjoy!

This dish is free from gluten, lactose and sugar.
It is suitable for vegan, paleo and LCHF  eaters (although for someone eating LCHF, you could add almonds on the side or add a magic bullet tea/coffee afterwards to get the fat percentage you need)

9 Comments

  1. Pingback:Tastebud: Broth and concentrated stock | TASTECELEBRATION

  2. Yet another flavorful, healthful recipe from tastecelbration.com, keep up the brilliant work! We too avoid unfermented soy products in our home and I agree that you don’t have to have the tofu element to have an enjoyable bowl of warm miso soup.

    Two thoughts about miso…

    If one is using a living miso (with active live bacteria) to make the soup and would like to ingest the live cultures, I understand it is recommended to add in the miso at the very end when the soup is complete and has cooled to a temperature of 46C (114F) to avoid any pasteurizing of the miso.

    Also, If you live in a country where commercial food production is dominated by giant bio-chemical companies like me here in the United States, one should look for certified organic miso, as 94% of soy grown in the U.S., sadly, is genetically modified to keep it alive when being sprayed with chemical herbicides.

    • Thank you George! Funny that we share the ideas about the unfermented soya. I also always go for the organic one if I have to buy any soya products, if I only could understand why that they have to mess so much with the beans…Interesting with the temperature, I will surely think about that the next time i use my miso.
      I really appreciate your tips and trick, thank you!

  3. Pingback:Did you try the white miso?

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